FELDENKRAIS

About Feldenkrais

“Make the impossible, possible; the possible easy; and the easy elegant”

Moshe Feldenkrais

The Feldenkrais Method is for anyone who wants to reconnect with their natural abilities to move, think and feel. Whether you want to be more comfortable sitting at your computer, playing with your children, cooking, driving, or performing a favourite pastime, these gentle lessons can improve your overall well being. 

Learning to move with less effort makes daily life easier. Because the Feldenkrais Method focuses on the relationship between movement and thought, increased mental awareness and creativity accompany physical improvements. Everyone, from athletes and artists to administrators and attorneys, can benefit from the Feldenkrais Method.

We improve our well being when we learn to fully use ourselves. Our intelligence depends upon the opportunity we take to experience and learn on our own. This self learning leads to full, dynamic living.

Ordinarily, we learn just enough to function. For example, we learn to use our hands well enough to eat, our legs well enough to walk. Our abilities to function with a greater range of ease and skill, however, remain to be developed. The Feldenkrais Method teaches—through movement—how we can improve our capabilities to function in our daily lives. 

 

About Moshe Feldenkrais

Moshe Pinhas Feldenkrais was born on May 6, 1904, in Slavuta, in the present-day Ukrainian Republic. In 1918 Feldenkrais left by himself on a six-month journey to Palestine.

After arriving Palestine in 1919, Feldenkrais worked as a laborer until 1923 when he returned to high school to earn a diploma. While attending school he made a living by tutoring. After graduating in 1925, he worked for the British survey office as a cartographer. Feldenkrais was involved in Jewish self-defense groups, and after learning Jujitsu he devised his own self-defense techniques. He hurt his left knee in a soccer match in 1929. 

In 1930 Feldenkrais went to Paris and enrolled in an engineering college, the Ecole des Travaux Publics des Paris. He graduated in 1933 with specialties in mechanical and electrical engineering. In 1933 after meeting Jigaro Kano, Judo’s founder, Feldenkrais began teaching Jujitsu again, and started his training in Judo.

In 1933 he began working as a research assistant under Frederic Joliot-Curie at the Radium Institute, while studying for his Ingeniur-Docteur degree at the Sorbonne. From 1935-1937 he worked at the Arcueil-Cachan laboratories building a Van de Graaf generator, which was used for atomic fission experiments.

Feldenkrais escaped to England in 1940, just as the Germans arrived in Paris. As a scientific officer in the British Admiralty, he conducted anti-submarine research in Scotland from 1940-1945.

While there he taught Judo and self-defense classes. In 1942 he published a self-defense manual, Practical Unarmed Combat, and Judo. Feldenkrais began working with himself to deal with knee troubles. Feldenkrais gave a series of lectures about his new ideas, began to teach experimental classes, and work privately with some colleagues.

In 1946 Feldenkrais left the Admiralty, moved to London, and worked as an inventor and consultant in private industry. 

Feldenkrais returned to Israel to direct the Israeli Army Department of Electronics, 1951-1953. Around 1954 he moved permanently to Tel Aviv and, for the first time, made his living solely by teaching his method. 

Around 1955 he permanently located his Awareness through Movement® classes to a studio on Alexander Yanai Street. He gave Functional Integration lessons in the apartment where his mother and brother lived. In early 1957 Feldenkrais began giving lessons to Israeli Prime Minister, David ben Gurion.

In the late 1950’s Feldenkrais presented his work in Europe and the United States. In 1968, near his family’s apartment, he made a studio at 49 Nachmani Street as the permanent site for his Functional Integration practice, and location for his first teacher-training program, 1969-1971, given to 12 students.

After giving month-long courses internationally, he taught a 65-student, teacher-training program in San Francisco over four summers, 1975-1978. He published The Case of Nora in 1977, and The Elusive Obvious in 1981. He began the 235-student Amherst training in 1980, but was only able to teach the first two summers of the four-year program. After becoming ill in the fall 1981, he stopped teaching publicly. He died on July 1, 1984.

 

About Stella Marcos

I have more than 15th years experience like a movement teacher. I started to work on my body since I was a child, studying dance and then yoga and from there I developed I new body conscious which encourage me to investigate other body techniques like Feldenkrais, Euthonia, Antigymnastic, Sensoperception, ecc.

 

  • Feldenkrais Method Practitioner, certified by the European Training Accreditation Board -EuroTAB -. 

  • Pilates teacher. Certified by the  Federación Española de Pilates (FEP.).

  • Corporal Expression Teacher. According the school of Patricia Stokoe. Certifed by Escuela de Expresión Corporal de Madrid. Accredited by Madrid Community and the EPTA.

  • Nuat Thai, Traditional Thai Massage. Actually do workshops for other Thai professionals.

 

 

 

 

Other studies:

  • Conscious movement with Marta Schinca 

  • Sensopercepction, Eutonia  with Susana Estela

  • Psicodrama con Susana Kesselman.

  • Classical dance and contemporaneous (Graham, Limon, Release, Laban and Contact Improvisation) in Madrid and London. 

 

Do classes either in Spanish and English

CONTACT.

Calle 25   iiwi A6   Guadalmina Alta

(close to hotel barcelo)

29670 Marbella

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